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Tabulate and Sketch

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Imagining images at peg locations is a good way to memorise prompts of text which you want to memorise. You can also use pegs to store tabular information or a sketch.

The following table assumes that 6 peg locations are needed per table cell of information. Eg. Sulphuric Acid, if stored at a cell of the table, might use 6 pegs as follows:

Note: A cell is one of the rectangles of a table - just the place where a fact is written in.

1. The image for SU; 2. the image for LP; 3 the image for HU; 4. the image for RI; 5. the image fro AC; and 6. the image for ID: spelling Sulphuri..Acid.

I had to trim it a bit to make it fit in the 6 pegs!

(Maybe SU and AC would be sufficient for you to remember that you are meant to write 'Sulphuric Acid' at a cell.)

It would be far better to already know an image to represent sulphuric acid (something I mentioned in the calendar article).

If a 4 column table can have its 4 headings prompted by 4 images then the following table needs those 4 pegs plus 560 pegs. That's a lot but it might be worth the effort in an exam 'fact cramming' situation.

Heading 1 Heading 2 Heading 3 Heading 4
Pegs 1 to 6 Pegs 7 to 12 Pegs 13 to 18 Pegs 19 to 24
Pegs 25 to 30 Pegs 31 to 36 Pegs 37 to 42 Pegs 43 to 48
Pegs 49 to 54 Pegs 55 to 60 Pegs 61 to 66 Pegs 67 to 72
For 3 more rows


you want


another 72 pegs


For 3 more rows


you want


another 72 pegs


For 3 more rows


you want


another 72 pegs


For 3 more rows


you want


another 72 pegs


For 3 more rows


you want


another 72 pegs


For 3 more rows


you want


another 72 pegs


For 3 more rows


you want


another 72 pegs


If a cell only needs 3 pegs to prompt spell a word then the other 3 pegs of the cell are dormant. That is a bit wasteful but it helps to be disciplined to not complicate the recall of the table.


Another alternative use of a peg system is to draw a sketch such as a biology diagram. For this, there should be developed a code where an imagined image is really a drawing instruction:

- Is the next thing I draw a line from one point on the paper to another point on the paper?; or

am I going to state one point on the paper and then draw an effect that is centered there? Or is it an annotation?

- If a line is drawn, is it wavy? In what way? Does it have another quality such as being a dotted line? What are its start and end points?

- If it is a curved line, is it skewed in its symmetry?

- If the art is an effect drawn at a point, what is that point co-ordinate? Which effect is it? In what direction is it drawn? What scale size is used for the effect?

- Is there part of what you drew that has a gap in it as if an eraser was used on part of it?

- What are the dimensions of the page? (It might be portrait or landscape.)

- An annotation would need information about a line pointing to a part of the diagram: start point, end point; and then a prompt as to what the annotation says.

A code could use a number image to mean that a line or curve of some type is intended; or an effect or an annotation. Eg. 000-099 might be types of line curviness and whether it is skewed; 100 to 599 might be effects to draw (and scale clue); 600 to 999 might be length and angle information of an annotation line. Eg. a short line drawn in the direction of 80 degrees.

For a line, an 2 images are used to plot a start point and 2 images are used to plot an end point; whereas an effect or annotation need 2 images to plot the starting point.

The effect needs to know the angle it is to be drawn in. Eg. a leaf shape needs to know which way to point. So a number form 000 to 180 can represent that.

The annotation needs one or more images to prompt what the text of the annotation is. How do you know that it is finished and that the next image you recall is to do with drawing something new? The Yes/No note of whether the item needs an eraser effect on part of it can be a standard way to say, "STOP" and to know that the next item recalled is to do with drawing something else. That can be developed further to include strength of brush stroke or some other quality.